Insurance companies for Part D Prescription Drug Plans

If Company A, which sends an email every other day for three months before turning 65 and up to three months later, charges much more than Company B for exactly the same coverage, why not go with company B? Part D, as most of you know, is a prescription drug insurance plan designed by Medicare but operated by several companies. However, companies are not doing this as a favor to Medicare. While a company can pay for their medicines, Medicare reimburses them an additional 10% for operating costs. Ten percent may not sound like much, but when it comes to millions of people, whether they are elderly, disabled or Medicaid beneficiaries, who qualify for a drug plan, their profit is millions of dollars.

Medicare’s prescription drug program was created as a result of the Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA). Although the act became law in 2003, people eligible for Medicare did not start enrolling in those plans until January 1, 2006. This plan is known as a PDP or simply Part D. Part D is available to anyone who has Medicare, regardless of income or medical history. Private insurance companies offer Medicare part D plans coverage. Affiliates select a plan from those available in their geographic region and pay the insurer a monthly premium for coverage. Although registration is voluntary, there is a late registration penalty that will be discussed a little later.

In short, if each individual plan is exactly the same from one company to another, how do you choose the right insurance company? First, you should learn as much as possible about each of your independent health insurance agent’s individual plans, which makes choosing the right health insurance agent your first priority. You need an experienced licensed agent who takes the time to explain the various plans in a way that you can understand. So customer service varies from company to company, so word of mouth, whether good or bad, can help you decide. Because past history is the best indicator of future results, consider past customer service experiences or complaints that you or someone you know may have had with any of the leading insurance companies. Now that you know that all plans must be exactly the same from one company to another, why not go with the company that offers the lowest monthly premiums, assuming, of course, that it’s a national brand that owns heard?